proSA® Pressure setting

The proSA is available as a combination of a differential pressure unit with an adjustable gravitational unit.

 

 

 

Standard pressure levelswith standard differential pressure unit* (cmH2O)recommendation for the adjustable gravitational unit (cmH2O)
children up to 5 years and adults 60 years plus520
children 5 years plus and adults up to 60 years525

*as special configurations in addition to the standard configuration, diffential pressure units with pressure levels 0,10,15 cm H2O are available

Factors for pressure level optimisation
commentgravitional unit pressure adjustment
MobilityStandard pressure levels are suitable for active people.For bedridden patients or inactive patients we recommend a very low pressure setting of the gravitational unit
Height

The hydrostatic suction effect normally depends on the height of the patient.<1,60 m: - 5 cmH2O
>1,80 m: + 5 cmH2O
WeightThe peritoneal pressure inhibits drainage. Therefore the use of the gravitational unit should be considered for overweight patients as a function of body-mass-index (BMI)5-29 BMI: - 5 cmH2O
30-34 BMI: -10 cmH2O
35-39 BMI: -15 cmH2O
>40 BMI: proSA is not recommended

Reading the pressure setting of the adjustable gravitational unit from a radiograph

The setting of the proSA should be controlled with the proSA-VERIFICATION TOOL. Furthermore a control can be undertaken with the help of a radiograph. The rotor tip indicates the setting of the adjusted pressure level.

On the radiograph, four boreholes on the rotor appear as dark dots, whether on the schematic picture the boreholes are white dots. The rotor tip, which is opposite to the boreholes, indicates the pressure setting.

Any position for the rotor is possible dispite the (not adjustable) grey range indicated. An adjustment of the gravitational unit of the proSA is possible from 0 to 40 cmH2O in increments of 1 cmH2O. In order to verify correctly the adjusted pressure setting and avoid reverse reading on the radiograph, the valve is designed with a cut-out on the upper left hand side.